Rediscover Gujarat. Rediscover the Gujarati in you !!


Channels : Free Home Pages | Chat | Discussion Board | Graffiti | Music | Reminder Services | Calendar | Horoscope | Dating | Weather | Matrimonial | Jobs

Info

City Guides | City News | Education | Festivals | Food | Greetings | Earthquake fact file | Home

October 20, 2001 - October 20, 2001

Post-WTC, quake victims suffer paranoia relapse Saturday, October 20, 2001

TIMES NEWS NETWORK
AHMEDABAD: It is devastation revisited in Ahmedabad. Thanks to the terrorist attacks in the US that flattened the towering WTC, those terrorising few seconds of January 26, the painful period of recuperation after being buried under tonnes of debris for hours together, have suddenly begun to haunt Amdavadis.

"The building is going to fall. Everybody get out or we'll be buried dead under the debris", shouts Nirav Thakkar who refuses to go inside his second floor flat in Maninagar.

This sudden return of paranoia is strange as Thakkar had after months of psychiatric treatment and counselling almost recovered from the shock of seeing his house collapse in the earthquake. This, until he caught a glimpse of WTC towers crashing on September 11 and anxiety and fits of fear have come to haunt him with a vengeance!

Sixteen-year old Bhairavi Patel is suffering similar bouts of sleeplessness, accelerated heart-beats, sweating and remains eternally engulfed with the fear of death. "I will not go to school..... the building will fall. All my friends and me will get killed", Bhairavi voices the same concern that had kept her from school for two months after she witnessed the tragic death of students of Swaminarayan School.

Barely had some semblance of normalcy returned in Bhairavi's life when the visuals of WTC explosions and continuous bombing on TV brought traumatic memories re-flooding her sensitive mind.

Thakkar and Bhairavi are not the only ones. Psychiatrists confess that more and more quake-patients are complaining relapse of stress disorders after the terrorist attacks on the US.

"On the face of it, there may be no link between the two tragedies that have happened months and miles apart. But the human mind has this strange tendency to relive old memories, especially if the memories are painful", explains psychiatrist Hansal Bhachech.

Bhachech confesses that at least six of his quake-patients have come back to him complaining restlessness, anxiety, insomnia, abdominal distress and exaggerated startling response - all symptoms of acute stress disorder that they suffered post-earthquake.

The fear generated by US attacks is preying upon Amdavadis in other ways, too. Psychiatrists concede that there is a sudden spurt in the number of patients complaining aero-phobia or the fear of flying.

Take the case of Prahlad Patel who used to fly abroad at least once a week on business but has suddenly developed cold feet about stepping into an aircraft. "Ever since he saw the two planes crashing into the WTC towers, he has developed this sudden fear of his plane getting hijacked", says psychiatrist Mrugesh Vaishnav, who got ten cases of aerophobia in the past month.

Interestingly, Patel confesses to be aware of the fact that death can strike anywhere and so he should not fear flying but the paranoia continues to plague his mind obviously costing his business dearly.

"Earlier, we used to get cases of aerophobia but the fear was of the aircraft crashing. Post US attacks, the fear is now more of the plane getting hijacked", adds Dr Vaishnav.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Post-WTC, quake victims suffer paranoia relapse Saturday, October 20, 2001

TIMES NEWS NETWORK
AHMEDABAD: It is devastation revisited in Ahmedabad. Thanks to the terrorist attacks in the US that flattened the towering WTC, those terrorising few seconds of January 26, the painful period of recuperation after being buried under tonnes of debris for hours together, have suddenly begun to haunt Amdavadis.

"The building is going to fall. Everybody get out or we'll be buried dead under the debris", shouts Nirav Thakkar who refuses to go inside his second floor flat in Maninagar.

This sudden return of paranoia is strange as Thakkar had after months of psychiatric treatment and counselling almost recovered from the shock of seeing his house collapse in the earthquake. This, until he caught a glimpse of WTC towers crashing on September 11 and anxiety and fits of fear have come to haunt him with a vengeance!

Sixteen-year old Bhairavi Patel is suffering similar bouts of sleeplessness, accelerated heart-beats, sweating and remains eternally engulfed with the fear of death. "I will not go to school..... the building will fall. All my friends and me will get killed", Bhairavi voices the same concern that had kept her from school for two months after she witnessed the tragic death of students of Swaminarayan School.

Barely had some semblance of normalcy returned in Bhairavi's life when the visuals of WTC explosions and continuous bombing on TV brought traumatic memories re-flooding her sensitive mind.

Thakkar and Bhairavi are not the only ones. Psychiatrists confess that more and more quake-patients are complaining relapse of stress disorders after the terrorist attacks on the US.

"On the face of it, there may be no link between the two tragedies that have happened months and miles apart. But the human mind has this strange tendency to relive old memories, especially if the memories are painful", explains psychiatrist Hansal Bhachech.

Bhachech confesses that at least six of his quake-patients have come back to him complaining restlessness, anxiety, insomnia, abdominal distress and exaggerated startling response - all symptoms of acute stress disorder that they suffered post-earthquake.

The fear generated by US attacks is preying upon Amdavadis in other ways, too. Psychiatrists concede that there is a sudden spurt in the number of patients complaining aero-phobia or the fear of flying.

Take the case of Prahlad Patel who used to fly abroad at least once a week on business but has suddenly developed cold feet about stepping into an aircraft. "Ever since he saw the two planes crashing into the WTC towers, he has developed this sudden fear of his plane getting hijacked", says psychiatrist Mrugesh Vaishnav, who got ten cases of aerophobia in the past month.

Interestingly, Patel confesses to be aware of the fact that death can strike anywhere and so he should not fear flying but the paranoia continues to plague his mind obviously costing his business dearly.

"Earlier, we used to get cases of aerophobia but the fear was of the aircraft crashing. Post US attacks, the fear is now more of the plane getting hijacked", adds Dr Vaishnav.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Post-WTC, quake victims suffer paranoia relapse Saturday, October 20, 2001

TIMES NEWS NETWORK
AHMEDABAD: It is devastation revisited in Ahmedabad. Thanks to the terrorist attacks in the US that flattened the towering WTC, those terrorising few seconds of January 26, the painful period of recuperation after being buried under tonnes of debris for hours together, have suddenly begun to haunt Amdavadis.

"The building is going to fall. Everybody get out or we'll be buried dead under the debris", shouts Nirav Thakkar who refuses to go inside his second floor flat in Maninagar.

This sudden return of paranoia is strange as Thakkar had after months of psychiatric treatment and counselling almost recovered from the shock of seeing his house collapse in the earthquake. This, until he caught a glimpse of WTC towers crashing on September 11 and anxiety and fits of fear have come to haunt him with a vengeance!

Sixteen-year old Bhairavi Patel is suffering similar bouts of sleeplessness, accelerated heart-beats, sweating and remains eternally engulfed with the fear of death. "I will not go to school..... the building will fall. All my friends and me will get killed", Bhairavi voices the same concern that had kept her from school for two months after she witnessed the tragic death of students of Swaminarayan School.

Barely had some semblance of normalcy returned in Bhairavi's life when the visuals of WTC explosions and continuous bombing on TV brought traumatic memories re-flooding her sensitive mind.

Thakkar and Bhairavi are not the only ones. Psychiatrists confess that more and more quake-patients are complaining relapse of stress disorders after the terrorist attacks on the US.

"On the face of it, there may be no link between the two tragedies that have happened months and miles apart. But the human mind has this strange tendency to relive old memories, especially if the memories are painful", explains psychiatrist Hansal Bhachech.

Bhachech confesses that at least six of his quake-patients have come back to him complaining restlessness, anxiety, insomnia, abdominal distress and exaggerated startling response - all symptoms of acute stress disorder that they suffered post-earthquake.

The fear generated by US attacks is preying upon Amdavadis in other ways, too. Psychiatrists concede that there is a sudden spurt in the number of patients complaining aero-phobia or the fear of flying.

Take the case of Prahlad Patel who used to fly abroad at least once a week on business but has suddenly developed cold feet about stepping into an aircraft. "Ever since he saw the two planes crashing into the WTC towers, he has developed this sudden fear of his plane getting hijacked", says psychiatrist Mrugesh Vaishnav, who got ten cases of aerophobia in the past month.

Interestingly, Patel confesses to be aware of the fact that death can strike anywhere and so he should not fear flying but the paranoia continues to plague his mind obviously costing his business dearly.

"Earlier, we used to get cases of aerophobia but the fear was of the aircraft crashing. Post US attacks, the fear is now more of the plane getting hijacked", adds Dr Vaishnav.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

NID director elected member of ICSID board Saturday, October 20, 2001

TIMES NEWS NETWORK
AHMEDABAD: Dr Darlie O Koshy, Executive Director, National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad has been elected member of the ICSID (International Council of Societies of Industrial Design) Executive Board during the 22nd general assembly of ICSID which took place at Seoul, Korea on 12-13 October, 2001.

In a closely contested election among the member countries, Dr Koshy got the third highest votes. There are nine members on the ICSID Executive Board besides a president and a treasurer. The general assembly, comprising members from 53 member countries with 151 member organisations and 1,50,000 members, is headed by its president.

Luigi Ferrara of the Design Exchange in Canada is the new president-elect. The executive board has thus 11 members in all and it functions for a period of two years. The tenure of this board will be 2001-2003, till the next Congress and general assembly-Hanover, Germany.

ICSID had been established in 1957 to advance the discipline of industrial design at the international level. It functions as a non-profit, non-government organisation supported by professional, promotional, educational, associate and corporate member societies in all the continents. Today, ICSID facilitates co-operation and interaction among its 151 member societies spread in 53 countries. The ICSID Network consists of an executive board, an advisory senate, member societies and affiliated organisations.

These bodies work together in the area of professional practice, education, promotion and development to enhance both the ways designers work and the context within which they practice, creating close nexus of design with education and industry.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Gujarat quake figure revised to 12,251 on eve of CM's visit Saturday, October 20, 2001

BY BHARAT DESAI, TIMES NEWS NETWORK
AHMEDABAD: The Kutch quake toll continues to fall. As Chief Minister Narendra Modi prepares for his first visit to the region on Friday, the district authorities have come up with a figure of 12,251. And even this is tentative and could be off the mark by about 100!

In the government's first published document on the quake brought out by the Directorate of Information in April, just two months after the January 26 disaster, the figure was put at 18,315. Initially, a few days after the quake, figures like 30,000 were being bandied about and defence minister George Fernandes had pegged the figure at 1 lakh.

Once the dust settled down in subsequent months, official documents mentioned the toll as 17,553, 15,552 and 13,333 in their inter-actions with international lending agencies. But the figure of 13333, arrived at after painstaking scrutiny in July, has fallen further with the latest count putting it at 12251, according to sources. Kutch collector Harsh Chibber still puts the toll at "anything between 12000 and 12500".

Confusion persists because there seems to be some duplication here and there. Official sources say the initial figures were inflated because the deaths were reported in more than one place _ police station, block development office, tahsildar's office and municipalities and panchayats. Besides, in the same office more than one relative had reported the death of the same person.

The records have all been computerised now, but Chibber says "there are still some loose ends left to be tied". The toll also got inflated because several compensation claims filed were found to be bogus on scrutiny. There are still about 90 cases where the persons who were cremated are still unidentified.

In all, compensation amounting to Rs 103 crore has been paid in 11,072 cases of death which have been confirmed. In some cases, compensation has not been paid because of legal disputes involving the heirs. Compensation is being been paid at the rate of Rs 60,000 for children and Rs 1 lakh for adults.

Official figures indicate that Rs 119 crore has been paid to about 2.23 lakh persons whose houses were partially damaged. A total of 2.63 lakh houses were partially damaged in the quake. Besides, Rs 117 crore has been paid to 69,312 persons whose houses have been totally damaged. A total of 96,812 houses were totally damaged in the district.

The shortfall in the number of persons paid the compensation for damaged houses is because the money, in the rest of the cases, has been routed through NGOs. The district has also spent about Rs 23.50 crore for providing temporary shelter to 21,903 families.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Gujarat | Pharmacy SEO | Copyright 2000-2006
 A eZee Web Solutions Presentation !

E-mail - webmaster@cybervapi.com
GSM - 9825130401