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October 1, 2001 - October 1, 2001

Man misusing Union govt website held Monday, October 1, 2001

TIMES NEWS NETWORK
AHMEDABAD: The Economic Offences Cell of the Criminal Investigation Department (crime) arrested a mechanical engineer who had defrauded three persons to the tune of Rs 5 crore by misusing a Government of India site.

The EOC acted on a complaint from a Naroda-based industrialist Chandubhai Panchal and arrested Amit Doshi who belongs to Ahmedabad but had settled in Surat since 1999, superintendent of police S G Bhati told TNN.

Doshi launched a bogus outfit called Central Projects and Development Organisation (CPDO) and register it as a trust and a co-operative society. "He then maintained his website address as 'www.cpdo.org', which was exactly like the website address of the Government of India's 'Central Projects and Development Orientation' (CPDO)," Bhati said.

Posing as a superintending engineer of the GOI firm, he would approach business parties and offer services for roads and building projects. Panchal, who manufactures air compressors, met Doshi and was promised business in African countries. Doshi placed an order for Rs 6 crore worth of material and took Rs 3 crore as security and miscellaneous charges.

Similarly, he took Rs 1.20 crore from 'Fine Builders' for a housing society contract, and also approached Bharuch-based Oriental Developmental Corporation whose proprietor mortgaged his bungalow for Rs 34 lakh with him as security, Bhati added.

After receiving complaints from Panchal and the rest, Doshi was picked up from Surat on Saturday and booked for cheating. He is on a 15-day remand.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


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Man misusing Union govt website held Monday, October 1, 2001

TIMES NEWS NETWORK
AHMEDABAD: The Economic Offences Cell of the Criminal Investigation Department (crime) arrested a mechanical engineer who had defrauded three persons to the tune of Rs 5 crore by misusing a Government of India site.

The EOC acted on a complaint from a Naroda-based industrialist Chandubhai Panchal and arrested Amit Doshi who belongs to Ahmedabad but had settled in Surat since 1999, superintendent of police S G Bhati told TNN.

Doshi launched a bogus outfit called Central Projects and Development Organisation (CPDO) and register it as a trust and a co-operative society. "He then maintained his website address as 'www.cpdo.org', which was exactly like the website address of the Government of India's 'Central Projects and Development Orientation' (CPDO)," Bhati said.

Posing as a superintending engineer of the GOI firm, he would approach business parties and offer services for roads and building projects. Panchal, who manufactures air compressors, met Doshi and was promised business in African countries. Doshi placed an order for Rs 6 crore worth of material and took Rs 3 crore as security and miscellaneous charges.

Similarly, he took Rs 1.20 crore from 'Fine Builders' for a housing society contract, and also approached Bharuch-based Oriental Developmental Corporation whose proprietor mortgaged his bungalow for Rs 34 lakh with him as security, Bhati added.

After receiving complaints from Panchal and the rest, Doshi was picked up from Surat on Saturday and booked for cheating. He is on a 15-day remand.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


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Bharuch :: French doctors to conduct medical camp in Bharuch Monday, October 1, 2001

TIMES NEWS NETWORK
VADODARA: A team of leading French doctors will conduct a medical camp in Bharuch in November.

The camp is being organised at the request of Bharuch hospital, which has got consent from French organisation 'Association Sanitaire de La Reunion'.

The association has been conducting medical camps across the world for 13 years, Bombay Patel Welfare Society president Mohammed Patel said.

He said the medical camps will also cover Ankleshwar, Nabipur, Navetha, Dahej and Vagra. "The contingent of medicos include 40 personnel, among them 19 doctors, paramedical staff, nurses and technicians."

The team will be divided in two groups. While one group will work in Bharuch, the other will conduct camps in surrounding rural areas," Patel said.

The camp will begin on November 3.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


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Workshop held on women's health Monday, October 1, 2001

TIMES NEWS NETWORK
VADODARA: MSU's Women's Health Training Research and Advocacy Centre (WHOHTRAC) held a two-day workshop on 'Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Social Science Research on Women's Health' in the city. Keynote speaker, SEWA co-ordinator Mirai Chatterjee, resource persons' professor Padmini Swaminathan from Madras Institute of Development Studies and Lakshmi Lingam from Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) shared their views on seminar subject. The speakers suggested that in a university set-up an interdisciplinary group of professionals should continue to function and find out ways of sustaining their activities. The speakers also suggested that such activities should be placed in the larger socio-political context affecting women's health.

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


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Guiding the taste of India Monday, October 1, 2001

Times News Network
AHMEDABAD: A small railway station in a village 30 km off Rajkot had a regular visitor. A young boy would trudge up every evening and, with wonder in his eyes, watch the giant locomotives - how they worked, hissed out steam and pulled the bogies. The technology amazed him.

About more than four decades later, machines continue to amaze him. And, he is mixing this love for technology with uncanny marketing sense to turn the country's food habits more and more utterly, butterly and delicious.

And, as B M Vyas, as managing director of Amul, today occupies one of the high positions in the milk capital of India, the market forces and the cut-throat competition does not affect him. For, the man says he is playing one-day matches. "It's Amul versus Britannia one day, Amul versus HLL the other. You forget the strains and the tribulations by the end of the day," says Vyas, who believes in keeping his personal life away from his work.

For a man who's every move is now watched keenly by people, from the food industry to the common food lover on the street, as he plans a massive launch of "affordable" pizza, ready-to-eat food and confectioneries, Vyas' calm and composed posture is at times unnerving.

"I will not carry the cheese that I produce here when I die and leave this world. God will not ask me how many pizzas I have sold. My life is not guided by the stock markets," he says, then points at the MD's chair and adds: "I sit on this chair. I never allow this chair to sit on me. I control power. I don't let it overpower me."

But, Vyas' calmness isn't surprising either, his philosophy of life being guided by works of great men. He doesn't recall his physics and mathematics lessons as much as he remembers those story-telling sessions in his school when he heard about the lives of Buddha, Mahavira and Ashoka and later read about Ramakrishna and the works of Swami Vivekananda at the Ramakrishna Mission in Rajkot.

"These are the people who guide you when you are troubled or are standing at the cross-roads," says the man who has depended more on life than books to learn his lessons.

"There was a blacksmith in my village whose work fascinated me. I used to watch him heat the iron objects and then cool them. Later, when our physics teacher taught us heat as a subject, I could grasp the concept easily while my classmates struggled," says Vyas.

"I had seen a lot of steam locomotives in Rajkot. We even used parts of locomotives to use them as stumps during cricket matches. Later, when others in the company struggled with a problem of stopping flowing out water from a machine, I knew exactly what was to be done as I had observed water flowing out of the locomotives in Rajkot," he adds.

He has learnt from people around him too, a big influence on him being Tribhubandas Patel, the man who spearheaded the co-operative movement. "I have never seen a leader more objective than him. He was an outstanding judge of people," says Vyas.

Vyas remembers the day he became the managing director in 1994 and someone congratulated Tribhubandas for "having promoted the right person to the post". "I still remember how Tribhubandas shot back. He told the person that the language he used wasn't right. 'I did not promote him. He rose to this position on his own good work', that is what he told the person. He was a towering personality and I miss him even now," recalls Vyas.

"Dr Verghese Kurien cannot be compared to Tribhubandas Patel. The comparison is like that between Ramkrishna and Vivekananda. They are in two different planes altogether," says Vyas.

Association with Tribhubandas Patel was a big event in the life of the man who got into Amul in 1971 just because his pay there was better than what his previous employer, Elecon Engineering in Vidyanagar, was giving him. Later, he liked the freedom he enjoyed, the scope for creativity and the presence of a person like Patel.

And, the young engineering student of a college in Vidyanagar in the 1960s, who every day crossed the Amul Dairy building, the tallest in Anand then, today not only sits in a taller building, but also walks tall.

Yet, Vyas has his ears close to the ground. He could sense the changing times and consumer patterns when the economy opened up in 1991. "The society was different then, guided by a set of rules. 1991 changed all that and the society began behaving differently, a new society guided by new set of rules, a new lifestyle. People are now poor on time and rich in money. They are ready to pay any amount to buy convenience that would save their time. We just read the consumers' mind and devised the products for this new customer," he says as matter-of-fact, having deciphered, with ease, the heart of the matter on his way to our stomachs.

And, this philosophy, that Vyas makes sound simple enough, will very soon guide our taste buds, the way we eat and probably bring about a revolution in the very "taste of India".

News Source : The Times of India [India's best Newspaper]


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