Rediscover Gujarat. Rediscover the Gujarati in you !!


Channels : Free Home Pages | Chat | Discussion Board | Graffiti | Music | Reminder Services | Calendar | Horoscope | Dating | Weather | Matrimonial | Jobs

Info

City Guides | City News | Education | Festivals | Food | Greetings | Earthquake fact file | Home

August 14, 2001 - August 14, 2001

Textile industry puts on designer shoes Tuesday, August 14, 2001

BY AMIT MUKHERJEE, TIMES NEWS NETWORK
SURAT: Textile manufacturers of Surat, for the first, will be participating in a national garment fair, in collaboration with the National Institute of Fashion Technology, Hyderabad, to promote its products in a bid to bail the sluggish textile industry out of the clutches of recession and prepare it for the global market.

The industry, which has about 4,00,000 looms generating fabrics worth more than Rs 8,000 crore annually, is facing a crisis in the wake of recession. While the production of fabric continues to be the same, there has been a significant decline in profitability, with profit margins touching an all-time low. Also, with greater demand for better fabrics, and threat of severe competition in near future, the industry is now into a major brainstorming.

While 14 fabric manufacturers will be setting up stalls at the Garment Fair 2001, at Begumpet, organised by the Garment Manufacturers and Wholesalers Association of Hyderabad, six leading garment manufacturers of Surat will be presenting their fabrics on the ramp during three fashion shows.

The event is being held from August 17 to August 19. More than 800 prospective buyers and manufacturers of designer garments are expected to visit the show.

The Surat participation is being promoted at the behest of the Surat Art Silk Manufacturers Association (SASMA), which is trying out ways to promote city's fabrics at national and international platforms.

SASMA had signed a memorandum of understanding with NIFT-Hyderabad, in January, pertaining to the inflow and exchange of information, focusing the capability of manufacturing various fabrics, on the one hand, and the fabrics required for up-market consumers on the other.

To date, Surat's traders and manufacturers had been dealing in bulk, supplying sarees and dress materials to the wholesale market. "There has been a significant development in market trends. There has been a significant demand for finished products, rather than fabrics. This would be an effort to tap manufacturers of designer garments," says SASMA president Arun Jariwala.

Under the provisions of the MoU, NIFT-Hyderabad will create designer dresses for six fabric producers of Surat -- Garden, Himsons, Krishma Fabrics, Suntex, Bamberg and SUSMA -- which will be displayed at ramps.

NIFT-Surat, meanwhile, has selected fabrics that are going to be displayed at the stalls.

"We are designing two dresses for each of the 14 participants which would be displayed at their stalls," said Anjali Mahapatra, the administrative incharge of NIFT-Surat. Also NIFT-Surat will help organise the buyer-seller meet for the Surat industry.

The ministry of textiles have also made provisions for setting up garment parks to promote synthetic fabric-based garments, which enjoys a sizeable share in the international market.

"With India exporting 70 per cent of cotton-based fabric, which enjoys only 20-30 per cent of the market share, Surat has a better opportunity to cater to the non-cotton-based export market," said Jariwala. Such garment fares would provide better market opportunities, feels Jariwala.

Also, interactions at such fares would expose Surat manufacturers to current trends and hi-tech products. "We will also come to know of better technologies being employed. Profits generated would motivate our manufactures to invest in modern and better equipment, leaving behind the older machines and looms," Jariwala says.
Source - TIMES NEWS NETWORK & AGENCIES

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Textile industry puts on designer shoes Tuesday, August 14, 2001

BY AMIT MUKHERJEE, TIMES NEWS NETWORK
SURAT: Textile manufacturers of Surat, for the first, will be participating in a national garment fair, in collaboration with the National Institute of Fashion Technology, Hyderabad, to promote its products in a bid to bail the sluggish textile industry out of the clutches of recession and prepare it for the global market.

The industry, which has about 4,00,000 looms generating fabrics worth more than Rs 8,000 crore annually, is facing a crisis in the wake of recession. While the production of fabric continues to be the same, there has been a significant decline in profitability, with profit margins touching an all-time low. Also, with greater demand for better fabrics, and threat of severe competition in near future, the industry is now into a major brainstorming.

While 14 fabric manufacturers will be setting up stalls at the Garment Fair 2001, at Begumpet, organised by the Garment Manufacturers and Wholesalers Association of Hyderabad, six leading garment manufacturers of Surat will be presenting their fabrics on the ramp during three fashion shows.

The event is being held from August 17 to August 19. More than 800 prospective buyers and manufacturers of designer garments are expected to visit the show.

The Surat participation is being promoted at the behest of the Surat Art Silk Manufacturers Association (SASMA), which is trying out ways to promote city's fabrics at national and international platforms.

SASMA had signed a memorandum of understanding with NIFT-Hyderabad, in January, pertaining to the inflow and exchange of information, focusing the capability of manufacturing various fabrics, on the one hand, and the fabrics required for up-market consumers on the other.

To date, Surat's traders and manufacturers had been dealing in bulk, supplying sarees and dress materials to the wholesale market. "There has been a significant development in market trends. There has been a significant demand for finished products, rather than fabrics. This would be an effort to tap manufacturers of designer garments," says SASMA president Arun Jariwala.

Under the provisions of the MoU, NIFT-Hyderabad will create designer dresses for six fabric producers of Surat -- Garden, Himsons, Krishma Fabrics, Suntex, Bamberg and SUSMA -- which will be displayed at ramps.

NIFT-Surat, meanwhile, has selected fabrics that are going to be displayed at the stalls.

"We are designing two dresses for each of the 14 participants which would be displayed at their stalls," said Anjali Mahapatra, the administrative incharge of NIFT-Surat. Also NIFT-Surat will help organise the buyer-seller meet for the Surat industry.

The ministry of textiles have also made provisions for setting up garment parks to promote synthetic fabric-based garments, which enjoys a sizeable share in the international market.

"With India exporting 70 per cent of cotton-based fabric, which enjoys only 20-30 per cent of the market share, Surat has a better opportunity to cater to the non-cotton-based export market," said Jariwala. Such garment fares would provide better market opportunities, feels Jariwala.

Also, interactions at such fares would expose Surat manufacturers to current trends and hi-tech products. "We will also come to know of better technologies being employed. Profits generated would motivate our manufactures to invest in modern and better equipment, leaving behind the older machines and looms," Jariwala says.
Source - TIMES NEWS NETWORK & AGENCIES

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

CERC's seeks repurchase of UTI units Tuesday, August 14, 2001

AHMEDABAD: Consumer Education and Research Centre (CERC) has urged Union finance minister Yashwant Sinha to see that Unit Trust of India repurchased the units at the pre-freeze price of Rs 14 each.

In a memorandum to Sinha, CERC also stated that the limit of repurchase by UTI be increased from 3,000 to 10,000 units. The CERC plea to Sinha is the second since the freeze was announced on 2, July 2001.

CERC said small holders, who in fact are the loyal UTI investors, should not be penalised for no fault of theirs. And also since the big investors had already taken advantage of higher repurchase prices and exited, smaller holders of units up to Rs 1 lakh should be redeemed at the price prevalent prior to the crisis.

It further demanded that the functioning of UTI be made transparent and accountable.
Source - TIMES NEWS NETWORK & AGENCIES

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

ACB arrests PSI, constable for taking bribe Tuesday, August 14, 2001

By Times News Network
VADODARA: The Anti-Corruption Bureau arrested a police sub-inspector and a constable for taking a bribe of Rs 10,000 from a person to investigate a police complaint.

The PSI and constable have been identified as S G Waghela and Ramesh Rohit respectively. They are posted at the Makarpura police station. The victim, who also happens to be the complainant, has been identified as one Kaushik Dholakia.

The ACB trapped the PSI and the constable on Saturday after Dholakia lodged a complaint that Waghela was asking for a bribe to investigate a police complaint that he had filed with the Makarpura police.

Dholakia had lent Rs 50,000 as loan to one Dilip Mehta of Himmatnagar. When Mehta denied to return the loan, Dholakia informed the city police about this. Dholakia then was adviced to lodge a complaint with the Makarpura police, which he did so but PSI Waghela asked for a bribe of Rs 20,000. Then Dholakia struck a deal and convinced the PSI that he would pay Rs 15,000.

On Saturday, the PSI sent a constable to collect Rs 10,000 as first installment of the bribe.

Meantime, Dholakia had informed the ACB about it and a trap was laid. When the deal was struck, the ACB team present at the spot nabbed the two policemen red handed.
Source - TIMES NEWS NETWORK & AGENCIES

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Stardom at a price for engineers Tuesday, August 14, 2001

BY SOURAV MUKHERJEE, TIMES NEWS NETWORK
AHMEDABAD: Post-quake, structural engineers of the city have been catapulted to overnight stardom. Structural engineers, who used to receive a minuscule half per cent of the project cost, compared with 3% paid to architects, are now looking at an upwardly mobile career graph complete with fringe benefits like the much-sought-after 'status'.

However, the sudden changeover from the backroom to the centre-stage has its downside, too. The recently-formulated General Development Control Regulations (GDCR) make mentions galore about structural engineers and put their job open to scrutiny with a healthy dose of accountability thrown in.

The development control regulations drawn up by the state government with respect to structural safety put down the qualification and experience required in a structural designer to certify structural safety of a building, in black and white.

It says: "A degree civil engineering recognised by All India Board of Technical Education. In addition, the applicant should have at least five years' experience in structural design, two years of which must be in a responsible capacity in the form of structural designer."

One with a Master's degree in structural engineering from a recognised institute and at least two years' experience in structural design work, or a doctorate in structural design from a recognised institute and at least one-year experience in structural design work will, after registering with the AUDA or the AMC, be allowed to prepare and submit structural details of all types of buildings and other structures.

Already a total of 120 civil and construction engineers have registered with the AMC. Of these 75 are structural designers.

Once the formalities are completed, the structural engineer will prepare a report on the structural design of the building. He will draw up a safe structural design keeping the soil-bearing capacity of the plot in mind and specify the right mix of construction material to ensure the strength of columns, beams and slabs.

He will also certify structural safety and overall soundness of the structure and advise on implementation of the project. In short, the structural engineer will be responsible for the safety of the building and its occupants.

"Structural engineering is an extension of civil engineering," explains P N Patel, who obtained his master's degree in civil engineering, specialising in structural designing, way back in 1977. After working with the PWD and teaching at LD College of Engineering in Ahmedabad and LE College, Morbi, Patel retired in 1981. Ever since he has been running his own consultancy firm.

"Our work is like building a skeleton for the human body. Ensuring a strong foundation and stability of the framework of concrete slabs, beams and columns that hold together a multi-storeyed structure is our responsibility. The correct mixture of the building material and the steel reinforcement required for a building have to be calculated by structural engineers," explains Patel.

"We have to ensure, through a complex mode of calculations, that the building's load is evenly distributed in harmony with its architectural design. The only change now will be that subjects hitherto not a structural engineer's priority _ horizontal forces of earthquake, wind force and the possibility of floods _will have to be taken into account while making the calculations," says Patel.

Another significant addition made by the GDCR to the structural engineers' responsibility is inspection of the work at important stages of construction and certify that the work being executed is satisfactory. This aspect could take the technocrats to the site of construction which, till date, was not amongst their responsibilities.

The star status and heightened financial gains apart, the additional responsibilities conferred by the GDCR have not gone down well with the structural engineers of the city.

Says Hitendra Soni of SMPS Consultants: "Admittedly, the regulations are comprehensive and liberal in handing out accountability to technocrats like us. But the requirements laid out by the regulations are overlapping in many cases and thus impossible to adhere to in totality."

Points out Soni, "The regulations have also forced us to procure expensive computers and software packages needed for the extensive calculations necessary for drawing up a structural design. This will increase the cost of structural designing and slow down the work, as structural engineers would adopt the path of caution in the wake of GDCR's unnecessary checks and balances."

"A structural engineer's work is limited to the drawing board where he advises the architects, builder-developers and owners on how to construct a structurally sound building. That post-quake we are more in demand is apparent, but holding us accountable for how a project is implemented is going a little too far," remarks Umang Patel, a structural engineer working with Cactic Consultants.

For many though, the tables have turned at long last – from following the diktats of architects to a commanding position in construction business.

Says Sanjiv Kapasi, a structural engineer heading the operations of Grid Consultants, Navrangpura: "Though one can't say that the demand for structural engineers have sky-rocketed after the quake, there is a perceptible change. Now, one feels like a visiting specialist medical practitioner."

Soon after the quake, Kapasi, had rendered voluntary structural engineering services and inspected nearly 150 high and low-rise buildings in the city.
Source - TIMES NEWS NETWORK & AGENCIES

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Gujarat | Pharmacy SEO | Copyright 2000-2006
 A eZee Web Solutions Presentation !

E-mail - webmaster@cybervapi.com
GSM - 9825130401