Rediscover Gujarat. Rediscover the Gujarati in you !!


Channels : Free Home Pages | Chat | Discussion Board | Graffiti | Music | Reminder Services | Calendar | Horoscope | Dating | Weather | Matrimonial | Jobs

Info

City Guides | City News | Education | Festivals | Food | Greetings | Earthquake fact file | Home

April 13, 2001 - April 13, 2001

Gujarat may get another $300 mn as quake relief Friday, April 13, 2001

ANAND: Gujarat is likely to receive a further assistance of around $300 million from the World Bank.

"Within five to six months, we should be able to provide new credit of roughly $300 million," World Bank vice-president for South Asia region Mieko Nishimizu told newsmen here on Thursday.

Though Nishimuzu refused to divulge the amount of the final loan package, she hinted that "it's going to be large."

She was here to address the twentieth annual convocation of the Institute of Rural Management, Anand (IRMA).

"The grand total of loan we have already provided India and the new loans we hope to give, comes to something like $1 billion or so. However, this is a small amount compared to the massive relief work required to be put in," said Nishimizu.

"When we assist a project like earthquake relief, we see the quality of preparation. Here, it has been excellent. We will also have to consider that for first one or two months, the whole system was in a state of shock," she said.

"We are not the only financiers. The biggest financiers are the people, the tax-payers of India. External agencies like us can only come in to help," she added.

Not commenting on whether the loan amount would be handed over to the government or NGOs, Nishimizu said "it is the people and organisations that draw up projects. It's their work that we finance. We are working together.

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Kurien expresses anguish at rural managers Friday, April 13, 2001

ANAND: "India's milkman" and father of the White Revolution Verghese Kurien expressed concern over the flight of trained rural managers to the corporate sector and called for the "return of the prodigal son".

Addressing the twentieth annual convocation of the Institute of Rural Management, Anand (IRMA), Kurien told the graduating students in no uncertain terms: "Some of you, I know, have already chosen a different path. You have, for the moment, turned your back on the purpose for which IRMA was founded."

He expressed hope that the students "like the prodigal son, shall return."

Kurien, who is also the Chairman of the IRMA board of governors, said "I hope that you shall discover through experience that the richness of life comes not with a pay slip but from placing ones talents at the service of those who genuinely need them."

"We hope that for at least some of those who graduate today, professional management will be an instrument to emancipate others, not a ticket to a comfortable life," Kurien said.

Expressing his anguish, Kurien remarked "For some, I fear, such idealism is unfashionable. We seem to have become infatuated with 'the market' and the citizens of our cities are moving toward a consumerism that even those in the West might find excessive."

The anguish was also visible in the speech delivered by IRMA director Katar Singh who expressed doubts that "in helping rural people realise their dreams, you may not get the best monetary rewards ..."

Singh went on to assure the graduating students that they "will certainly get the love and affection and deep satisfaction that comes to only those who dedicate their lives to the cause of bettering the lives of others, especially the poor and the under-privileged."

Kurien said, "The question arises for those who are concerned - where do we begin? I would suggest that we must begin at the easiest and, at the same time, the most difficult point: ourselves."

"Be the change that you want to be in the world - these words of Mahatma Gandhi are, if anything, more relevant today than they were spoken.

He lauded those who have decided to stick to their goals. "I am happy that some of you have chosen the road less travelled. You will work with co-operatives or with organisations that will serve co-operatives and rural people. I applaud you," he said.

"And, I warn you. This will not be an easy road. You will face disillusionment. Not all co-operative leaders and managers are saints. Not everyone will recognise your worth. There are even those who will oppose you. You will often question whether it is at all worthwhile and whether you can, indeed, make a difference," he added.

"Let me urge you to face your future every day with courage, with patience and humility. If you persevere, you will make a difference. And, it is a difference upon which the future of our nation rests," Kurien said.

Katar Singh went to the extent of reminding the students that their "training at IRMA is highly subsidised."

"You pay only 10 per cent of the real resource cost of your training. So, you owe a lot to your alma mater, to the founding fathers of IRMA, i.e. NDDB, and to society. You have, therefore, a moral responsibility to repay this by serving for at least three years or so in one of the designated organisations of IRMA," Singh said.

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

"Wide gap between intention and action" says world bank vice-president Friday, April 13, 2001

ANAND: Why did Gujarat lose so many lives while a similar earthquake in Seattle left not a single dead just a month later, wondered World Bank vice-president for South Asia region Mieko Nishimizu.

Nishimizu, who delivered the keynote address at the twentieth annual convocation of the Institute of Rural Management, Anand (IRMA) on Thursday dwelt on the dichotomy faced by India -- there have been path breaking strategies but still there is TB and malaria; there have been committed thinkers yet there are so many illiterate people.

Pointing out the discrepancies in the Indian system, Nishimizu said "The truth, then, is this - there is a vast gap in India between intention and action, between strategy and implementation and between policy and outcome."

"Poverty has always been the focus of public discourse in India and able and committed planners and thinkers have built this concern into sound, path-breaking strategies. Their words have not been empty. India has contributed some of the most innovative and pioneering work to empower her poor and marginalised people," said Nishimizu who holds a PhD degree in economics from Johns Hopkins University and left professorship at Princeton University to join World Bank's fight against poverty when she met a girl child dying silently in a slum in Cairo.

"Why, then, is India still home to a disproportionately large number of poor people, of illiterate people, of malnourished children, of people afflicted with HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases ?," she wondered.

"I have been truly humbled by the iron will, unbroken courage and fighting spirit of the people of Gujarat to overcome the calamity of the recent earthquake. Yet, I cannot help but ask one question: Why is it that citizens of Gujarat were so vulnerable that too many perished and even more lost their homes and livelihoods ? Who among us was not struck by the contrast to the earthquake that violently shook Seattle a month later, where not a single person died ?" she asked.

"There are many factors we know about, and many we do not know about, that work to achieve growth worth equity. I hold a view that quality of leadership - in governments and throughout civil society - is one such factor that is of enormous import," said Nishimizu.

"I dare say, India without poverty will remain a mere dream without the humble and tolerant leadership throughout the nation, from Delhi, to her state capitals, to cities, to towns, to slums, to 'her seven hundred thousand villages' and most likely more - leaders of courage, who draw strength from humility, find peace in tolerance and gain true power by giving it away," she added.

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

"Wide gap between intention and action" says world bank vice-president Friday, April 13, 2001

ANAND: Why did Gujarat lose so many lives while a similar earthquake in Seattle left not a single dead just a month later, wondered World Bank vice-president for South Asia region Mieko Nishimizu.

Nishimizu, who delivered the keynote address at the twentieth annual convocation of the Institute of Rural Management, Anand (IRMA) on Thursday dwelt on the dichotomy faced by India -- there have been path breaking strategies but still there is TB and malaria; there have been committed thinkers yet there are so many illiterate people.

Pointing out the discrepancies in the Indian system, Nishimizu said "The truth, then, is this - there is a vast gap in India between intention and action, between strategy and implementation and between policy and outcome."

"Poverty has always been the focus of public discourse in India and able and committed planners and thinkers have built this concern into sound, path-breaking strategies. Their words have not been empty. India has contributed some of the most innovative and pioneering work to empower her poor and marginalised people," said Nishimizu who holds a PhD degree in economics from Johns Hopkins University and left professorship at Princeton University to join World Bank's fight against poverty when she met a girl child dying silently in a slum in Cairo.

"Why, then, is India still home to a disproportionately large number of poor people, of illiterate people, of malnourished children, of people afflicted with HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases ?," she wondered.

"I have been truly humbled by the iron will, unbroken courage and fighting spirit of the people of Gujarat to overcome the calamity of the recent earthquake. Yet, I cannot help but ask one question: Why is it that citizens of Gujarat were so vulnerable that too many perished and even more lost their homes and livelihoods ? Who among us was not struck by the contrast to the earthquake that violently shook Seattle a month later, where not a single person died ?" she asked.

"There are many factors we know about, and many we do not know about, that work to achieve growth worth equity. I hold a view that quality of leadership - in governments and throughout civil society - is one such factor that is of enormous import," said Nishimizu.

"I dare say, India without poverty will remain a mere dream without the humble and tolerant leadership throughout the nation, from Delhi, to her state capitals, to cities, to towns, to slums, to 'her seven hundred thousand villages' and most likely more - leaders of courage, who draw strength from humility, find peace in tolerance and gain true power by giving it away," she added.

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Action against Nadiad councillor Friday, April 13, 2001

NADIAD: The state director of municipalities has removed former president of Nadiad municipality DR Shah as councillor under the Gujarat Municipal Act 1963 Section 36(1) and section (6).

Earlier, the general body's term during Shah's tenure as president had ended in January 2000. But he was elected in the ensuing election held in January is a councillor.

During his tenure as president, Shah by violating municipal procedure relating to bank transaction withdrew municipal grant of Rs 41 lakhs from president's account without the chief officer's knowledge and deposited it in another local bank.

A representation was made to the director of municipalities against such 'irregular' transaction and he served show-cause notice on Shah. But there is no possibility of the execution of director's decision as the term of the general board had already ended in December 1999. Yet the order of Shah's removal was issued for people's knowledge and to maintain propriety. Otherwise legal provision could have come in handy, said informal sources.

Voice your opinion on this story Generate printer friendly page Send this page to your friend

Gujarat | Pharmacy SEO | Copyright 2000-2006
 A eZee Web Solutions Presentation !

E-mail - webmaster@cybervapi.com
GSM - 9825130401